Rent a villa in Positano!

Rent a villa in Positano!

An hour south of Naples, this 30-mile stretch of coastline is best known for its picturesque villages, such as Positano, Amalfi, and Ravello, perched on vertical slopes ter­raced with lemon trees. The area has been renowned for its beauty since antiquity: it was along this coast that Homer’s Ulysses strapped himself to his ship to avoid being lured into the sea by the Sirens’ song. Feeling the pull of the Amalfi Coast but you don’t know where to begin? Here are some travel ideas and general tips to jump start your itinerary planning:

Festivals

The view from Ravello

The view from Ravello

There are regional celebrations throughout the year, so be sure to find out in advance what local events are happening during your visit. The Wagner Music Festival runs from June to Septem­ber in Ravello at Villa Rufolo, featuring symphonies, chamber concerts, operas, ballets, and plays. On the first Sunday in June, Amalfi celebrates its history as one of the four Ancient Maritime Republic cities (including Genova, Pisa, and Venice) with a historic regatta; every four years the event is held in Amalfi. Galleons sail on the water crewed by locals in period costume. Sant’Andrea, Amalfi’s patron saint, is celebrated both on his birthday (November 30) and on the day a miracle saved the city from pirates (June 27). A statue of the saint is carried in procession, accompa­nied by fireworks, music, and food. On July 27th, Ravello takes their turn celebrating in honor of their patron saint, San Pantaleone, with a beautiful procession following by fireworks after dark. The view overlooking the coastline is not to be missed!

Wines

The slopes of Mount Vesuvius (near Naples) are some of the oldest wine-producing areas in Italy. The most famous wine is Lachryma Christi – literally, “Tears of Christ.” Other regional wines include Taurasi, a full-bodied red from Avellino, and Fiano d’Avellino, one of the best whites in Italy.

The Emerald Grotto

Looking towards Positano from Praiano, a charming fishing village where many of our properties are located. Photo credit: David_Ooms

Looking towards Positano from Praiano, a charming fishing village where many of our properties are located. Photo credit: David_Ooms

Accessible only by boat, the Grotto dello Smeraldo is breathtaking in its beauty. Once a dry-land cave, changes in the landscape allowed the brilliant blue-green water inside. Now glistening stalagmites jut out of the water; overhead, light dances over stalactites. The grotto is located in Conca dei Marini, about five kilometers west of Amalfi.

Cuisine

Amalfi Coast cuisine is seafood-based, incorporating locally grown produce such as tomatoes, lemons, and red peppers. Insalata caprese is a simple salad composed of sliced toma­toes, fresh mozzarella, basil, and olive oil. The coast’s other specialty is limoncello, a delicate, lemon-infused digestivo served ice cold.

Day Trip: Pompeii

The Circumvesuviana rail line skirts the base of Mount Vesuvius, connecting Naples and Sor­rento. Midway along the route, the Pompeii Scavi stop is just a few minutes on foot from the ruins. Tickets to the ruins at Pompeii now include entrance to Herculaneum, a sister city also destroyed by the volcanic eruption.

The Amalfi Coast is known for its citrus, which figures prominently in local cuisine.

The Amalfi Coast is known for its citrus, which figures prominently in local cuisine.

Hiking

Perched on precarious vertical slopes, everything on the Amalfi Coast is either up or down, so almost all visitors will get a workout! Serious hikers, however, may want to try some of the stupendous mountain trails. Tracing the crest of the coastline, the Sentiero degli Dei (Path of the Gods) is one of the most grueling – but everyone who tackles it swears the views are worth every step.